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Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation’s Farm to Early Care Program

Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation’s Farm to Early Care Program

By Morgan Ames, Tracey Capers, Craig Willingham, Sarah Wolf, and Nick Freudenberg

Across New York City and the nation, low-income and working families with young children endeavor to raise strong, healthy children; maintain their family’s health; find and keep decent jobs and affordable housing; create safe communities; and claim a voice in shaping their neighborhoods. At the same time, within these communities, resilient families and children, skilled and experienced leaders, and many established civic organizations with a history of organizing to improve their neighborhoods have shown the power of local action to promote health, equity and community development.

NYC Council Holds Hearing on the Future of the FRESH Program

NYC Council Holds Hearing on the Future of the FRESH Program

The Food Retail Expansion to Support Health (FRESH) program was launched in 2009 to encourage grocery stores to open in underserved communities by providing zoning and financial incentives to eligible grocery store operators and developers. The program is an effort between several New York City agencies and relies on input from city government and community groups.

Urban food pantries – an unreliable resource for the food insecure

Urban food pantries – an unreliable resource for the food insecure

In 2016, over 15.6 million U.S. households experienced food insecurity at some point, meaning at least one member of the household had limited access to adequate food due to lack of money or other resources. Access to adequate food may be conceptualized within five dimensions: availability (item variety), accessibility (e.g., hours of operation), accommodation (e.g., cultural sensitivity), affordability (costs, monetary or otherwise), and acceptability (e.g., as related to quality). For those who are food insecure, food pantries can be a vital resource for accessing food and meeting basic nutritional requirements.

Meet the Institute Summer 2018 Fellows!

The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute is proud to introduce its five Summer 2018 Fellowship participants! The Fellows – Kathy Liu, Beckett Flynn, Kian Williams, Ayelet Bahary, and Shelby Mosier – are assisting the Institute Directors and staff in pursuing multiple community-based research and action projects focusing on good food jobs, good food procurement, and urban food policies in New York and other cities in the US and internationally. Each fellow brings a diverse set of talents and interdisciplinary skills across the fields of public health science, policy, and management as well as ethics, gender studies, psychology, biology, and community development. This summer’s Fellowship participants come from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, the Child and Adolescent Research Development Lab at Brandeis University, and the CUNY School of Public Health and Health Policy. We are thrilled to have them on board!