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Bedford Stuvesant Restoration Corporation

Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation’s Farm to Early Care Program

Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation’s Farm to Early Care Program

By Morgan Ames, Tracey Capers, Craig Willingham, Sarah Wolf, and Nick Freudenberg

Across New York City and the nation, low-income and working families with young children endeavor to raise strong, healthy children; maintain their family’s health; find and keep decent jobs and affordable housing; create safe communities; and claim a voice in shaping their neighborhoods. At the same time, within these communities, resilient families and children, skilled and experienced leaders, and many established civic organizations with a history of organizing to improve their neighborhoods have shown the power of local action to promote health, equity and community development.

Creating Integrated Strategies for Increasing Access to Healthy Affordable Food in Urban Communities: A Case Study from Central Brooklyn

Creating Integrated Strategies for Increasing Access to Healthy Affordable Food in Urban Communities: A Case Study from Central Brooklyn

In a new case study published in the Journal of Urban Health, Afia Bediako, Tracey Capers, and Aysu Kirac from Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation (Restoration) and Michele Silver and Nicholas Freudenberg from the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute analyzed the role Restoration has played in changing food environments in Central Brooklyn. 

Commentary: Lessons from Evaluating Community Food Programs

Commentary: Lessons from Evaluating Community Food Programs

By Nicholas Freudenberg, Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

For the last five years, our Institute has been evaluating community food programs in 14 New York City neighborhoods. From my own participation and observation in these evaluation studies, I have come to appreciate both the positive and negative roles that evaluation can play in community food programs and also some of the dilemmas these efforts face. In this commentary, I describe some of the lessons from these experiences and raise some questions about evaluation for the food policy and food justice communities to consider. My goal is to help ensure that five years from now, we know more about what does and doesn't work to create healthier food environments in New York City.