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Food Access

Paths to Youth Food Activism: An Interview with Amy Kwan

Paths to Youth Food Activism: An Interview with Amy Kwan

Amy Kwan is a recent graduate of the Doctor of Public Health program at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. She is also an experienced staff person for several youth and community organizations and has participated in many participatory community health research studies. Amy’s doctoral dissertation From Food to Food Justice: Pathways and Narratives of Young Food Activists In New York City was completed in 2017. In this interview, Nicholas Freudenberg, CUNY Distinguished Professor of Public Health, Director of the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, and Amy’s dissertation faculty sponsor, asks her about the findings from her dissertation project.

"Healthy Food for All" Budget Requests Platform FY 2020

"Healthy Food for All" Budget Requests Platform FY 2020

Several organizations and coalitions, which include frontline direct-service emergency food providers; anti-poverty, senior advocacy, and immigrants’ rights groups; public health and academic institutions; and healthy food retail advocates, have together developed a New York City and State Healthy Food for All Budget Request Platform as a unified approach to advocate for New York City and State budgets that contribute to reducing hunger and promoting access to healthy, affordable food for all New Yorkers.

You Can Help Protect SNAP for College Students

You Can Help Protect SNAP for College Students

In our February Newsletter, we wrote about a SNAP rule change proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture. The new rule would increase hunger and food insecurity by restricting the ability of states to waive the time limits for receipt of SNAP by able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDS). [Read earlier article here].

The State of New York would be particularly hard hit by the proposed rule. Nationally, USDA estimates that more than three quarters of a million current recipients would lose their SNAP benefits. Comments must be submitted by April 2.

Proposed Rule Would Remove 755,000 People from SNAP Rolls

Proposed Rule Would Remove 755,000 People from SNAP Rolls

Once again, the Trump administration has posted a proposed rule change that would increase hunger and food insecurity in the United States. And again, advocates are calling for individuals and organizations to post comments during the mandatory 60-day comment period that ends on April 2. The proposed rule would change the basis on which the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) grants the states waivers from rules restricting unemployed adults without children to three months of SNAP benefits in a three-year period, commonly known as ABAWD regulations. USDA estimates that 755,000 people would lose benefits and predicts a net reduction in spending on SNAP benefits of $7.9 billion over five years. Some background may be helpful.

Proposed Public Charge Rule Threatens to Increase Food Insecurity in New York City

Proposed Public Charge Rule Threatens to Increase Food Insecurity in New York City

On September 22, 2018 the Trump Administration proposed changes in the "public charge" rules that would expand the discretion of the Office of Homeland Security to deny applications for green cards or certain types of visas.  This decision would be based on an immigrant’s age, family size, income, and assets, as well as based on whether they have utilized certain cash or non-cash public benefits or programs they are legally entitled to use, including use of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).  Such a change could make life more difficult for New Yorkers who depend on and are eligible for many of our nation's public benefit programs.  As Food Policy Monitor reported in its previous issue and discussed at the October Food Policy Forum, the proposed rule change could reverse recent progress in reducing food insecurity in New York City.

NYC Council Holds Hearing on the Future of the FRESH Program

NYC Council Holds Hearing on the Future of the FRESH Program

The Food Retail Expansion to Support Health (FRESH) program was launched in 2009 to encourage grocery stores to open in underserved communities by providing zoning and financial incentives to eligible grocery store operators and developers. The program is an effort between several New York City agencies and relies on input from city government and community groups.

Urban food pantries – an unreliable resource for the food insecure

Urban food pantries – an unreliable resource for the food insecure

In 2016, over 15.6 million U.S. households experienced food insecurity at some point, meaning at least one member of the household had limited access to adequate food due to lack of money or other resources. Access to adequate food may be conceptualized within five dimensions: availability (item variety), accessibility (e.g., hours of operation), accommodation (e.g., cultural sensitivity), affordability (costs, monetary or otherwise), and acceptability (e.g., as related to quality). For those who are food insecure, food pantries can be a vital resource for accessing food and meeting basic nutritional requirements.

REFRESH: Modifying the Food Retail Expansion to Support Health Program to Improve Healthy Food Access

REFRESH: Modifying the Food Retail Expansion to Support Health Program to Improve Healthy Food Access

by Nevin Cohen, Research Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

A decade ago, New York City set out to improve access to healthy food in neighborhoods with insufficient full-service grocery stores. The resulting Food Retail Expansion to Support Health (FRESH) program, adopted in 2009, was modeled after the Pennsylvania Fresh Food Financing initiative and mirrored similar efforts in cities, states, and the federal government. FRESH eased zoning requirements for supermarket development and offered financial benefits to encourage supermarket operators to open and expand stores in designated FRESH zones.

Event Summary: The 2017 Fordham Urban Law Journal Cooper-Walsh Colloquium

Event Summary: The 2017 Fordham Urban Law Journal Cooper-Walsh Colloquium

On Friday, October 20, 2017 The Fordham Urban Law Journal hosted its 2017 Cooper-Walsh Colloquium titled, “Taking A Bite Out of the Big Apple: A Conversation About Urban Food Policy” at the Fordham Law School Campus in Midtown Manhattan.

Join the Healthy Food Access Policy Network

Join the Healthy Food Access Policy Network

In response to the rapidly changing political landscape and building on the success of the Healthy Food Access Portal, PolicyLink, Reinvestment Fund, and the Food Trust have introduced a new Healthy Food Access Policy Network. The Network will serve as a central space to engage advocates through monthly newsletters. Members can: