header#header { position: fixed !important;}

Global Food

Food Sovereignty and Citizen-driven Initiatives in Madrid

Food Sovereignty and Citizen-driven Initiatives in Madrid

Globalization and neoliberal policies are shaping current food and agricultural systems. Food in cities and certain ideas regarding local food systems have emerged as counter-movements. As formulated in The Declaration of Nyéléni,* food sovereignty refers to “the right of people to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts those who produce, distribute, and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations.” This declaration is a transformative paradigm, which entails the inclusion of diverse social actors in the processes of consultation, planning and decision-making. A recent example from the city of Madrid shows how to bring citizens to the heart of urban governance processes.


* http://www.foodsovereignty.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Download-declaration-Agroecology-Nyeleni-2015.pdf

Dr. Amos Laar Discusses the Food Environment in Ghana at CUNY SPH

Dr. Amos Laar Discusses the Food Environment in Ghana at CUNY SPH

Amos Laar, Ph.D, a Senior Lecturer in the School of Public Health at the University of Ghana, visited the CUNY School of Public Health on Monday 2/11 to discuss his work to identify contemporary changes to the food environment in Ghana. Dr. Laar has written and presented extensively on maternal and young child nutrition, nutrition-related non-communicable diseases (NR-NCDs), as well as on the socio-cultural, socio-ethical, and medico-ethical dimensions of sexually, and perinatally transmissible infections – serving as a consultant to international organizations, national governments, and non-governmental organizations. You can read his most recent reports on Ghana’s Food Environment below.

Commercial Urban Agriculture in the Global City: Perspectives from New York City and Métropole du Grand Paris

Commercial Urban Agriculture in the Global City:  Perspectives from New York City and Métropole du Grand Paris

Shifting Urban Agriculture Landscapes

 

The landscape of urban agriculture – the growing of food and non-food products and the raising of livestock in and around cities— is ever-growing throughout cities of the Global North. This, despite the fact that it has often been disregarded as legitimate use of urban space, or as legitimate agriculture (Smit et al. 1996). In the last two decades, longstanding practices of urban gardening (including home-, allotment-, community-gardens, as well as gardens at schools, hospitals, and other institutions) have been joined by not-for-profit initiatives such as community farms, in the U.S. context, or jardins d’insertion that provide opportunities for social and workforce inclusion in the French context. These relatively recent iterations of urban agriculture in Global North cities, including New York and Paris, where we respectively live and work, often are focused on increasing food access and/or providing job training in low income communities (cf., Cohen et al. 2012, Simon-Rojo et al. 2016). 

Food, Cities, and the SDGs: Institute Staff Contributes to a New Report

Food, Cities, and the SDGs: Institute Staff Contributes to a New Report

On November 28th, the City of Milan (Italy) together with the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFNF) released a new report on the role of cities in advancing the SDGs. The report titled FOOD & CITIES: The Role of Cities for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals offers a comprehensive account of most recent urban food policy research and practice around the world and includes a dedicated section on seven exemplary case studies: Milan, New York, Ouagadougou, Rio de Janeiro, Seoul, Sydney, and Tel Aviv-Yafo. Institute staff contributed with the chapter on New York City examining how the City’s last ten years of food policy have helped advanced the two global frameworks for sustainable development and urban food systems – the UN SDGs and the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact (MUFPP).  BCFNF is a multidisciplinary think tank focused on the economic, scientific, social and environmental factors that shape agri-food systems and the advancement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through food.

Global Urban Food Policy: The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute Delegates at the WC2 Symposium in Toronto

Global Urban Food Policy: The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute Delegates at the WC2 Symposium in Toronto

In August 2018, delegates from the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute attended the fourth World Cities World Class University Network (WC2) Symposium on the topic of “Migration, the City, and the University” at Ryerson University in Toronto. The WC2 Network, of which CUNY is a member, brings together ten leading universities based in global cities around the world – from New York City to Mexico City, Sao Paolo, London, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Melbourne, and Toronto – with the shared goal of crafting joint solutions to some of the world’s most urgent and complex urban challenges.

Can Public Health Advocates in Europe and United States Together Protect Public Health Regulation of Food?

Can Public Health Advocates in Europe and United States Together Protect Public Health Regulation of Food?

In both Europe and the United States, public health regulation of the food industry is under attack.  In both these major world markets, the global food industry is using its power and influence to oppose taxes on sugary beverages, resist mandates for stronger regulation of food labeling, and defend continued presence of pesticides and herbicides in many foods.  But the growing health and economic burden of diet-related chronic diseases—also called non-communicable diseases—is creating new opportunities for support for stronger public health protection.