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The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute “Top 10” Food Policy Events of 2018

The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute “Top 10” Food Policy Events of 2018

The past year reminds us once again that, every step forward can be accompanied by steps backward which forced us to often take food policy “victories” with a grain of salt. To help Food Policy Monitor readers take stock of the past year, we identify our staff choices for the Top 10 positive and negative food events in 2018, defined as events that had an important impact on urban food environments in New York City or elsewhere.

“B-Side” Food Metrics

“B-Side” Food Metrics

In the days of vinyl, songs on the b-side got little air play and never made the charts, even though they often were as good as – or sometimes better than -- the hits. As we reviewed New York City’s 2018 Food Metrics Report, released in December by the Mayor’s Office of Food Policy, we identified a number of “b-side food metrics” that would enrich our understanding of the food system. Yet these are rarely given proper air time, and as a result are often overlooked by advocates. Because these already collected and public data are sometimes hard to find, not aggregated and organized as food metrics, , they remain hidden in plain sight. In the examples that follow, we illustrate the value of these data sources in answering important policy questions for each of the Food Metrics Report’s four topical areas.

Washington, D.C. Adopts the Good Food Purchasing Program

Washington, D.C. Adopts the Good Food Purchasing Program

On December 4th 2018, the Washington, D.C. City Council voted to confirm the city’s commitment towards implementing the Good Food Purchasing Program (GFPP) for the city’s public schools. The measure passed as part of a larger bill, B22-313 The Healthy Students Amendment Act, which intends to further student health and wellness. Getting the city’s commitment to the GFPP is the result of a yearlong campaign by a diverse coalition of community groups, labor unions, parents, local business leaders, D.C. Food and Nutrition Services and others advocating for access to healthy, high-quality meals for the city’s 48,000 students.

Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC: Perspectives from the Front Lines

Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC: Perspectives from the Front Lines

In preparation for our December 18th Urban Food Policy Forum on Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC we asked some of the city’s most prominent good food jobs champions to weigh in on two critical questions: (1) What one thing could elected officials (e.g. mayor, governor, council members, etc.) do in next year to promote good food jobs? and (2) What's the biggest obstacle to increasing the number of good food jobs in NYC and how does your organization/company address this obstacle? Here is what they shared.