header#header { position: fixed !important;}

Commentary

Two cheers for the half empty glass of soda: New York City’s New Happy Healthy Meals Bill

Two cheers for the half empty glass of soda: New York City’s New Happy Healthy Meals Bill

At the end of March, the New York City Council passed and sent to the Mayor legislation that  requires restaurants and other food service establishments to serve water, low-fat milk or 100% juice as the default drinks with children’s meals, rather than soda or other sugary drinks. Parents can still request these less healthy options but healthier choices will become the default option.  The law will go into effect on May 1, 2020 and will impose monetary penalties on restaurants that violate it. This new law, know as Local Law 75 of 2019, adds a new tool to the public health goal of reducing sugar consumption but also sets the stage for additional reforms.

Q and A on the Use of Food Policy Litigation to Advance More Equitable Food Systems

Q and A on the Use of Food Policy Litigation to Advance More Equitable Food Systems

By Nicholas Freudenberg, Director CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

This commentary seeks to encourage food policy advocates and the food justice movement to consider an appropriate role for litigation in reforming food systems in this era. The following Q and As summarize some of what we need to know to engage in that discussion. 

Commentary: Technology and the Future of the Food Workforce: An Exploration

Commentary: Technology and the Future of the Food Workforce: An Exploration

Commentary: Technology and the Future of the Food Workforce: An Exploration

by Craig Willingham, deputy director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

This commentary explores how technology is changing how and what we eat and the means through which food is produced, distributed and sold. A particular focus is what these shifts, catalyzed by developments in technology, mean for the future of workers in the food sector.

Commentary: Lessons from Evaluating Community Food Programs

Commentary: Lessons from Evaluating Community Food Programs

By Nicholas Freudenberg, Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

For the last five years, our Institute has been evaluating community food programs in 14 New York City neighborhoods. From my own participation and observation in these evaluation studies, I have come to appreciate both the positive and negative roles that evaluation can play in community food programs and also some of the dilemmas these efforts face. In this commentary, I describe some of the lessons from these experiences and raise some questions about evaluation for the food policy and food justice communities to consider. My goal is to help ensure that five years from now, we know more about what does and doesn't work to create healthier food environments in New York City.