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Washington, D.C. Adopts the Good Food Purchasing Program

Washington, D.C. Adopts the Good Food Purchasing Program

On December 4th 2018, the Washington, D.C. City Council voted to confirm the city’s commitment towards implementing the Good Food Purchasing Program (GFPP) for the city’s public schools. The measure passed as part of a larger bill, B22-313 The Healthy Students Amendment Act, which intends to further student health and wellness. Getting the city’s commitment to the GFPP is the result of a yearlong campaign by a diverse coalition of community groups, labor unions, parents, local business leaders, D.C. Food and Nutrition Services and others advocating for access to healthy, high-quality meals for the city’s 48,000 students.

Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC: Perspectives from the Front Lines

Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC: Perspectives from the Front Lines

In preparation for our December 18th Urban Food Policy Forum on Growing Good Food Jobs in NYC we asked some of the city’s most prominent good food jobs champions to weigh in on two critical questions: (1) What one thing could elected officials (e.g. mayor, governor, council members, etc.) do in next year to promote good food jobs? and (2) What's the biggest obstacle to increasing the number of good food jobs in NYC and how does your organization/company address this obstacle? Here is what they shared.

Commercial Urban Agriculture in the Global City: Perspectives from New York City and Métropole du Grand Paris

Commercial Urban Agriculture in the Global City:  Perspectives from New York City and Métropole du Grand Paris

Shifting Urban Agriculture Landscapes

 

The landscape of urban agriculture – the growing of food and non-food products and the raising of livestock in and around cities— is ever-growing throughout cities of the Global North. This, despite the fact that it has often been disregarded as legitimate use of urban space, or as legitimate agriculture (Smit et al. 1996). In the last two decades, longstanding practices of urban gardening (including home-, allotment-, community-gardens, as well as gardens at schools, hospitals, and other institutions) have been joined by not-for-profit initiatives such as community farms, in the U.S. context, or jardins d’insertion that provide opportunities for social and workforce inclusion in the French context. These relatively recent iterations of urban agriculture in Global North cities, including New York and Paris, where we respectively live and work, often are focused on increasing food access and/or providing job training in low income communities (cf., Cohen et al. 2012, Simon-Rojo et al. 2016). 

The Institute signs on Climate Healthy Menus Letters to Aramark and Sodexo

The Institute signs on Climate Healthy Menus Letters to Aramark and Sodexo

The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute along with 68 other organizations – including Natural Resources Defense Council, Community Food Advocates, DC Greens, Food and Water Watch, Friends of the Earth, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy, Oxfam America, and Real Food Challenge – signed on a letter asking Aramark and Sodexo – two of the world's largest multinational food service corporations supplying food to institutions like hospitals, universities, and school districts in the US and globally – to cut their purchases of climate intensive foods and increase purchases of plants.

Food, Cities, and the SDGs: Institute Staff Contributes to a New Report

Food, Cities, and the SDGs: Institute Staff Contributes to a New Report

On November 28th, the City of Milan (Italy) together with the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFNF) released a new report on the role of cities in advancing the SDGs. The report titled FOOD & CITIES: The Role of Cities for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals offers a comprehensive account of most recent urban food policy research and practice around the world and includes a dedicated section on seven exemplary case studies: Milan, New York, Ouagadougou, Rio de Janeiro, Seoul, Sydney, and Tel Aviv-Yafo. Institute staff contributed with the chapter on New York City examining how the City’s last ten years of food policy have helped advanced the two global frameworks for sustainable development and urban food systems – the UN SDGs and the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact (MUFPP).  BCFNF is a multidisciplinary think tank focused on the economic, scientific, social and environmental factors that shape agri-food systems and the advancement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through food.

Proposed Public Charge Rule Threatens to Increase Food Insecurity in New York City

Proposed Public Charge Rule Threatens to Increase Food Insecurity in New York City

On September 22, 2018 the Trump Administration proposed changes in the "public charge" rules that would expand the discretion of the Office of Homeland Security to deny applications for green cards or certain types of visas.  This decision would be based on an immigrant’s age, family size, income, and assets, as well as based on whether they have utilized certain cash or non-cash public benefits or programs they are legally entitled to use, including use of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).  Such a change could make life more difficult for New Yorkers who depend on and are eligible for many of our nation's public benefit programs.  As Food Policy Monitor reported in its previous issue and discussed at the October Food Policy Forum, the proposed rule change could reverse recent progress in reducing food insecurity in New York City.

Soda Taxes and the 2018 Midterm Election: Implications for New York

Soda Taxes and the 2018 Midterm Election: Implications for New York

In the November 6 midterm election, voters in Washington and Oregon voted on  ballot initiatives on soda taxes.  In the state of Washington, voters approved a measure that bans any new taxes on food and beverages.  In Oregon, voters rejected a similar ban.  An examination of these two experiences provides insights that may guide public health advocates in other states who believe that soda taxes are an important way to reduce diet-related premature deaths and preventable illnesses.